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Submitted by aynyaaba.cass on Fri, 04/06/2018 - 15:13

B A History

There are several courses spread out across the various years under department to make learning efficient. These are mostly course related subjects and topics of interest but interlaced with a few indirectly related subjects to educate in various aspects in order to produce a versatile graduate.

SHORT DESCRIPTION OF COURSES IN THE PROGRAMME

Year One

HIST 151 Introduction to Historical Studies I (3, 1, 3)
The course aims at introducing students to the different conceptions of the nature and evolution of history as an academic discipline. It also focuses on the elementary techniques for studying history.

HIST 152 Introduction to Historical Studies II (3, 1, 3)
The course traces the development of and the different approaches to historical studies since the twentieth century. It also examines the relations between history, science and the other social sciences as well as introduces the students to the professional writing of history.

HIST 153 Introduction to African History (3, 1, 3)
The course introduces students to the study of the African past through examination of key events and themes that have contributed to and or shaped the course of the continent’s history.

HIST 154 Selected Themes in World History (3, 1, 3)
The course aims at introducing students to the study of world history. It focuses on the key events and themes that have informed and shaped subsequent world history.

MATH 153 Social Statistics I (2, 1, 2) 
The course is an introduction to the nature and use of statistics and some basic concepts.  Descriptive analysis of data: Graphic and tabular representation of data, Calculation of measures of central tendency and dispersion, Coefficients of Skewness and kurtosis.

MATH 154: Social Statistics II (2, 1, 2)
Probability: Definition of some basic terms; conditional and independent events; some basic laws and rules in probability random variables and probability distributions; expectations and variance of random variables; discrete distributions: binomial and Poisson; continuous distributions: normal; sampling theory.

ENGL 157: Communication Skills I (2, 1, 2)
The course takes all first year students through a review of English grammar, and is a required course for all first year students of KNUST.  Students will be assisted to review some of the common problem areas of their writing, such as verb/tense system, concord, sentence construction and paragraph organization.  There shall also be a study of basic grammatical structures that shall involve teaching students to write formally correct sentences, avoiding sentence errors, and using punctuation effectively.

ENGL 158: Communication Skills II (2, 1, 2)
The course is designed to continue the process of helping students to become better writers.  The first part of the course will focus on writing skills - paragraphs, and then essays.  Students shall also study the preparation of technical documents such as memos, reports, letters, and proposals.

CSM 183: Introduction to Computers I (2, 1, 2)
The course is designed to introduce students to basic computer hardware and software as well as their application. It examines such areas as: What is a computer?, Classification of computers, Hardware-Memory, Central Processing Unit, Input/Output Devices,  Software-System, Applications, Utility, Translation, Programme Language and others,  Disk Operating System (DOS) and Windows as Operating Systems,  Word Processing Software: Microsoft Word.

CSM 184: Introduction to Computers II (2, 1, 2)
The course is a follow up to CSM 183. It focuses on Spreadsheet Software: Microsoft EXCEL; Relational Database Software: Microsoft ACCESS.

Year Two

HIST 251 History of Ghana up to 1800 (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to introduce students to how the modern state of Ghana evolved. It aims at giving insights into the major developments in the growth of societies and cultures in the region of modern Ghana. Indigenous participation in solving problems encountered over the years will be emphasized by studying the peoples of the region against the background of their economic, socio-cultural and political institutions.

HIST 252 History of Ghana 1800 to present day (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to introduce the students to the major events and themes that have shaped the history of modern Ghana since the nineteenth century.

HIST 253 History of West Africa since 1800 (3, 1, 3)
The course surveys the history of West Africa with a view to developing an understanding of the key factors that have shaped the region’s general development and its modern structures.

HIST 254 History of North Africa since 1800 (3, 1, 3)
The course surveys the history of the North African region with a view to development an understanding of theme factors that have shaped the region‘s general development and its modern structures.

HIST 255 History of Europe from 1780 -1870 (3, 1, 3)
The course examines the course and pattern of European development since the French Revolution. It explores such developments and issues as the emergence of industrialism, capitalism, and overseas expansion, social and economic developments.

HIST 256 History of European from 1870 -1939 (3, 1, 3)         
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 255.   It examines the pattern of development since World War I.  It explores such issues and developments as political organization, the growth of liberalism and the impact of technological advancement on world development.

ENGL 263 Literature in English I (2, 1, 2)        
This is a basic course in Literature, introducing all university students to opportunities to enjoy and love the world of books in English and in our various Ghanaian languages.  Special consideration will be given to language as the primary vehicle of literature.  Old classics as well as significant contemporary works by living authors will be studied.  The course will also draw range if disciplinary background and interests of the students who are expected to take this, the selection of texts will take into consideration the interrelations of literature and other disciplines.  The course will focus on poetry and drama.

ENGL 264 Literature in English II (2, 1, 2) 
The course has as its main components the study of folktales, short stories and the novel African and western texts representative of this genre shall be used to illustrate the language, themes, and the literary devices employed for these different types of fictional expressions.
 

Year Three

HIST 351 Research Methodsin History I (3, 1, 3)
The course seeks to inculcate in the student a deeper understanding and appreciation of the general theories and problems relating to historical enquiry. It also examines the different sources of historical data, their uses and limitations and how to reconcile conflicting historical information. 

HIST 352 Research Methods in History II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to further inculcate in the students practical skills and techniques in historical selection. This includes selection of topics, literature review and use of archival and electronic information sources as well as referencing.

HIST 353 History of East, Central and Southern Africa 1800 to World War I (3,1,3)

The course surveys the histories of East, Central and southern Africa with a view to broadening the scope of knowledge about the regions and developing an understanding of the key factors that have shaped their development. Key among the issues examined include the region’s geography and demography, indigenous economic, social and political systems, European advent and its aftermath as well as the growth of nationalism emancipation from European colonial rule.

HIST 354 History of East, Central and Southern Africa II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 353.  It examines the key events and developments that have shaped the regions’ history since World War I including the growth and nature of nationalism, emancipation, economic and social development, development of political ideas and personalities behind major changes in the regions. 

HIST 355 History of the USA 1700-1953 (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to introduce students to the political, economic and social development of the USA since 1700.  The course focuses closely on developments in the USA since the American Civil War.  It is designed to survey the main developments that normally periodize US history and will include such marginalized and frequently excluded minority segments as Native Americans, ethnic and religious minorities as well as women.

HIST 356 History of Russia 1700-1953 (3, 1, 3)
The course examines the history of Russia and USSR from the time of Peter the Great with a view to understanding the major ideas and events that have influenced and shaped the course of development in the region up to the Cold War era.

HIST 357 History of Science and Technology I (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to explore the development of science and technology since 1800 and how this development has impacted global economic, social and political development. African experiences in general, and Ghanaian experiences in particular is emphasized.

HIST 358 History of Science and Technology II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 357. Issues such as the incidence, procedures and problems of technology transfer and related financial, political, socio-cultural implications are studied. African case studies are selected for detailed study. Close attention is paid to the development of indigenous technology and its application in African societies.
 
HIST 359 Introduction to Archival Studies and Record Management I (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to introduce students to the different types of archival depositories and the organization of various categories of documents. It also introduces students to the various theories underpinning record management.

HIST 360 Introduction to Archival Studies and Record Management II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 359.  Students will be guided to organize different categories of documents. The practical experience will include working in different types of depositories where they will have hands-on experience in working with electronic, manual and mechanic storage systems.

HIST 361: Contemporary Problems in African History I (3, 1, and 3)
The course is designed to explore the major emerging issues and areas of studying African History. The objective is to inform students of emerging trends and discourse in African History and to equip them with tools to comprehend and analyze them.  The course will deal with such contemporary issues as gender, ethnicity, energy, poverty, class and power.

HIST 362 Contemporary Problems in African History II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow up to HIST 361.  The course exposes students to various policies regarding major issues covered in HIST 361.  It also examines the post-modern critiques regarding African History.

HIST 363 Cultural Survey of West Africa (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to survey the diverse cultures of West Africa and examine how major ideas and beliefs in the various epochs have influenced the development of architectural trends in the region.

HIST 364 History of Cultures (3, 1, 3)
The course surveys the dominant global cultures. It entails a comparative examination of how major ideas and beliefs in the various epochs have influenced the development of architectural trends in the world.  The course focuses more closely on how global trends have impacted architectural development in Africa.

HIST 365 History of Holocaust I (3, 1, 3)


HIST 366 History of Holocaust II (3, 1, 3)


HIST 367 History of Medicine I (3, 1, 3)


HIST 368 History of Medicine in Africa (3, 1, 3) 
 

Year Four

HIST 451 History of Christianity in Ghana I (3, 1, 3)
 

HIST 452 History of Christianity in Ghana II (3, 1, 3)


HIST 453 Economic and Social History of Ghana from 1800-1900 I (3, 1, 3)
The course is an advance study in the economic and social history of Ghana. It provides insights into the socio-economic development of modern Ghana. It focuses closely on the evolutionary processes and the philosophical underpinning that laid the foundation of modern Ghanaian society.

HIST 454 Economic and Social History of Ghana since 1900 II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 453. It is structured to equip students with deep insights into the economic and social conditions that have informed and shaped the history of modern Ghanaian society since 1900.

HIST 455 History of International Relations I (3, 1, 3)   
The course examines the general theories relating to the nature and evolution of relations between and among nations as well as international and multinational organizations. It exposes the student to particular relations between and among nations with a view to understanding concrete issues in world politics both past and present.

HIST 456 History of International Relations II (3, 1, 3)
The course aims at applying the insights gained from the study of general theories in HIST 455 to foreign policies and relations between and among selected nations and activities of specified international and multinational organizations.  The objective is to equip the student with the skills to understand the form and force of interests that lie behind inter-state as well as international and multinational organizations.

HIST 457 History of the African Diaspora I (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to explore the background, origin, process and impact of the dispersion of people of African descent throughout the Atlantic World since the fifteenth century. It also examines the cultural, social, economic and political implications of the dispersion.

HIST 458 History of the African Diaspora II (3, 1, 3)
The objective of the course is to consider the post-modern critiques of culture that have been and are being shaped by discourse in African Diaspora studies.  In addition, it will explore the cultural transformations resulting from the dispersion of African people throughout the Atlantic World since the fifteenth century.  The course focuses closely on the areas of religious worship, social organizations, music and dance, language and material culture.

HIST 459 Records Management and Archival Studies I (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as an advanced study of the various theories underpinning record storage and management. Students are also exposed to laws and ethical issues regarding record management. 

HIST 460 Records Management and Archival Studies I (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 459.  Students are guided to apply the theories learnt in organizing different categories of documents. The practical experience will include working in different types of depositories where they will have hands-on experience in working with electronic, manual and mechanic storage systems.

HIST 461 Intellectual History I (3, 1, 3)
The course surveys the history of ideas that have informed major social, economic and political institutions and events that have shaped world development up 1800.

HIST 462 Intellectual History II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow-up to HIST 459.  It explores the major social, economic and political ideas that have informed and shaped the history of the world since 1800.

HIST 463 Architectural History and Appreciation I (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed to explore the major critiques of culture that have been and are being shaped by the discourse on the development of modern architecture.  Ghanaian and African case studies will be emphasized.

HIST 464 Architectural History and Appreciation II (3, 1, 3)
The course is designed as a follow up to HIST 463.
 

HIST 469 History of Slavery in Africa (3, 1, 3)
The course surveys the history of slavery in Africa. It focuses closely on definitions and indigenous African understanding of slavery in comparison to Western conception of the phenomenon. It equips students with a clearer understanding of the development of the Trans Atlantic Slave trade and its implications for the development of African societies and communities outside the continent as well as the development of the slave routes.

HIST 470 Historical Monuments and Sites in Ghana (3, 1, 3)
The course surveys Ghana’s rich cultural heritage enshrined in its historical monuments. It will examine the history behind such edifices as the forts and castles that litter Ghana’s Coast as well as the slave markets and centers in places like Salaga, Praso and Manso as well as important religious and ritual centres like the “witches camp” in Northern Ghana, the traditional shrines at Edweso Besease, Esumegya – Asantemanso, and the Bobri Sanctuary. It will also examine the prehistoric human settlements in Ghana including the caves in the Nkoranza Traditional Area.

HIST 489 / 490 DISSERTATION (0, 12, 6) (3 Credits per Semester).
Final Year students are expected to conduct research, under supervision, on a given topic in her/his area of specialisation as part of the requirements for the award of the BA Degree. The topic, which needs to be approved by the student’s supervisor, must be such that the study is historical – oriented.

Programme Type